On the importance of being hypoallergenic

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The prefix “hypo” means low, below or less of. So when the prefix hypo is applied to allergens, we get hypoallergenic, a substance that is less allergic than normal. In other words a hypoallergenic substance is supposed to cause lesser allergies. Hypoallergenic is a useful term for anything that comes in contact with the skin, like personal care products or clothes.

The question is: lesser allergies than what?

An industry standard with no definition

Cosmetic companies started the usage of the term “hypoallergenic “in the 1950’s and it is now a commonly used term to describe household products, textiles and apparently pets.

Most commonly used standards in the industry, have systems for validation and certification. (For eg: Organic produce is widely regulated with many certification systems)

But there is no apparent definition or well regulated standard for hypoallergenic. This is all the more surprising since hypoallergenic sounds like a formal medical term (which it isn’t, because the medical fraternity does not recognize it). For example the Harvard medical dictionary chapter on allergies does not define hypoallergenic.

So when a product says it is ‘hypoallergenic’ what does it really mean?

  1. It does not contain allergic additives – A number of chemical additives are well documented as allergens and excluding them is an indication of hypoallergenicity. Examples of allergic additives are fragrances, bleaching agents, colour dyes
  2. It had no allergic reactions when a group of humans / animals tested it – A “patch” test is conducted on volunteers / test animals to check for allergies.  The product is applied on the volunteers’ skin and abnormal reactions like itching, irritation or redness are monitored for 12-24 hours. If no significant numbers of abnormal reactions are reported, then a hypoallergenic claim is made. Of course, the volunteer sample must be statistically valid in numbers, and in the case of human volunteers there should be a representation of different skin types to get a robust claim.

Note: We do not test on animals nor do we use animal derived ingredients at Krya.

Krya hypoallergenic standard

The Krya detergent is hypoallergenic. It is an important benefit in a detergent because clothes come into intimate, extensive contact with the skin. We have used several methods to arrive at the claim

  1. Extensive product use research for over a year
  2. It is the only detergent We use
  3. It is made from a gentle , organic fruit
  4. The fruit has been widely used as a skin and hair cleanser with use documented for hundreds of years
  5. Absolutely no dyes, bleaching agents or fragrances added. (We have added just 1 ingredient, Calcium Carbonate as a desiccant, which is a natural, edible , widely used, and well-researched ingredient )

And this is our contribution to the Hypoallergenic Hall of Fame.

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Sustainable by Design – To liquid or not to liquid

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At Krya, sustainability, usability and beauty are the three core principles of product design.

Sustainability forces constraints, as many cheap & easily available materials and processes are ruled out. But that’s okay, because it is difficult to design it into a product retrospectively.

At Krya we think about sustainable design at 6 stages

  1. Product design: ingredients, format, packaging.
  2. Raw material sources and their transport
  3. Manufacturing process
  4. Transport to consumer
  5. Consumer in use method
  6. Post consumer use disposal

At every stage of a product’s life cycle no decision is too small to be ignored. And each decision has to balance sustainability with usability for the consumers. Take for instance, the choice of product format.

Product format: To liquid or not to liquid?

Whether a product is a solid, liquid or somewhere in the continuum between plays an important role in determining a product’s sustainability.

It turns out that liquid products and sustainability just don’t mix.

Here’s why:

  1. Liquids = complex, resource intensive manufacturing
  2. Liquids often imply effluents
  3. The addition of water into a product requires a clean , antiseptic environment
  4. The addition of water also means possible bacterial contamination so preservatives are a must in the end product
  5. Liquids need tough containers – So hello plastic, goodbye paper
  6. Liquids are expensive to transport – they are voluminous, need special storage, & can be easily damaged

At Krya, we have made the decision to choose a solid format over a liquid format every time.

This commitment extends to our personal life as well. We have eliminated many liquid products like face wash, shampoo and conditioners. We have created organic, natural, fantastic powder alternatives to these categories.

Choosing a solid format over a liquid format can make a huge difference to the environment.

All it needs is an open mind.

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Sapindus Trifoliatus: or how the fruit became a detergent – Part 2

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The Ministry of Environment & Forest classifies industries as Red, Orange and Green, depending on how polluting they can be to the environment. Red industries are defined as heavily polluting industries, whose clearances are renewed every year.

Synthetic detergents and soaps fall into the Red classification.

Detergent manufacturing is usually a resource intensive, potentially heavy polluting activity.

How Krya manufactures the fruit that’s a detergent

We ‘manufacture’ our detergent by getting the friendly neighbourhood village ladies to pluck the ripe Sapindus trifoliatus from the tree at Harvest time.

The magic lies in deciding when a fruit is ripe enough to become a detergent – The experienced eyes of Mr.Anki Reddy, our resident soapnut & all things organic expert, help us decide that.

After removing the seed (the seed is stored carefully for re-planting), our friendly crew take the fruit or the pericarps to a giant stone platform which has been specially built on the farm.

The farm is in a dry, fiercely hot part of Andhra Pradesh, perfect to dry a water loving fruit like the Sapindus trifoliatus. The fruits dry slowly under the sun for 3 days in the sun until they become brittle.

We then collect them from the stone platform, clean them and take them into our ‘factory’ where they are powdered in a large mill (similar to the flour mill that makes the atta ,though much much cleaner).

We put a lot of thought into how fine the fruit gets powdered in a mill.

Powder them too fine, & they absorb too much moisture; Powder them too large, & you would need to use a lot more of them to wash.

We powder them just right – so that they don’t absorb too much moisture, and give you a perfect wash every time.

Once our Sapindus Trifoliatus has been powdered, we mix natural, organic Calcium Carbonate to the powder. Calcium Carbonate, also called Limestone, helps keep our dried fruit powder dry, so that it remains a powder, and easy to use.

And that completes our manufacturing.

We don’t use heavy machines that are energy intensive. The process also does not release harmful vapours.

We don’t use water in our ‘manufacturing, so no river or fishes or tadpoles are harmed during the making of our detergent.

We use just 2 ingredients and 97% of the ingredients are available in the farm right next to the factory. Normal manufacturing would require several ingredients, which would need to transported to the factory using fossil fuels.

It is a fruit, so all those 100+ litres of water that your washing machine used to wash clothes can be sent to your garden. The remaining detergent can be composted in the earth.

Your garden thanks you and so does the municipality whose load you’ve just lightened by reducing the load on the city’s sewage system.

That’s what we call being sustainable – from the farm, to your home, and back to mother earth.

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Sapindus Trifoliatus: or how the fruit became a detergent

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We unveiled our first sustainable gooThe fruit that's a detergentdie yesterday, the fruit that’s a detergent.

The fruit has a name. Trifoliatus. Sapindus trifoliatus.

A year ago I had no idea of the existence of such an awesome fruit. Through an incredible concatenation of events, Preethi & I found ourselves with a bag of Sapindus shells. We were thoroughly intrigued by the possibilities. What started off as an innocent laundry experiment a year ago has snowballed into our first business venture.

However I digress.

The Sapindus

The Sapindus is a group of around 10 species of trees whose fruits can be used as surfactants. The name Sapindus is derived from the Latin words Saponis, meaning soap and Indicus, meaning from India. They are commonly known as soapnuts or soapberries. Soapnuts, though isn’t technically right – as they are fruits and not nuts. For the botany snob hidden in you, we can go a step further and call them “pericarps”

India is home to several species of Sapindus. The two most well known of these are the South Indian Sapindus trifoliatus & the Himalayan Sapindus Mukorossi. All species of Sapindus are useful detergents in their own way.

The secret ingredient

The secret ingredient in the fruit is the Saponin which makes it a useful surfactant (or detergent).

Ergo, the fruit that’s a detergent.

How Surfactants clean

Plain water does not usually remove oily particles or tough dirt stains from clothes. The addition of surfactants helps to clean clothes in a two step process.

1. Reduce surface tension

    The surfactant molecules have a water-loving head that attaches to water molecules and a water-hating tail that attaches to the dirt molecules. This creates a force that detaches the dirt from the clothes & suspends the dirt in the water. The agitation of the washing machine or scrubbing by hand further helps detach the dirt from the clothes. As a result of the dirt getting detached the water now starts looking murky.

    2. Emulsification

    Now that the dirt has been removed, it is critical that they don’t re-deposit on the clothes. This is the done by the second action of the surfactant i.e emulsification. Emulsification is the process by which the dirt and the water form a mixture. This keeps the dirt suspended in the water till it is washed down the drain

    But the Sapindus is so much more

    The fruit that’s a detergent is a great surfactant which explains why it cleans so well. However it is so much more than just a surfactant.

    1. It is a certified organic product fruit. So it is absolutely bio-degradable and once used for washing leaves no trace of its existence.
    2. It is powdered to make a great detergent, so it consumes very little energy to manufacture.
    3. It is hypoallergenic, so it is gentle on hands, leaves no chemical residue on clothes, that can be harmful to skin.

    Food for thought

    In the first month of our experiments with the Sapindus we completely eliminated regular chemical detergents. However I am constantly amazed by how well the innocuous, light brown fruit cleans.

    But think about it, regular chemical detergents have been around for the last hundred years or so. However humans and dirty clothes have been around for thousands of years. More often than not it has been the fruit that’s a detergent that saved  the day.

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    Krya’s first sustainable goodie

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    Today is the first day, of a super exciting year. A brilliant day to talk about the first sustainable goodie from Krya.

    So we’ve made a detergent.By powdering a fruit.

    It washes really really well. In our washing machine. And in a bucket when we feel like it.

    We’ve washed everything known to us with the fruit that’s a detergent.  It Works.

    We save tons of water per cycle – because it is a non-fussy fruit, you need to rinse just once.

    And we direct all the wash water into the garden and not down the drain – it is safe because, hey, we are washing with a fruit.  And our plants grow really well.

    So we’ve established it is a goodie.

    Now for the part that makes it a sustainable goodie:

    1. It is a fruit.
    2. It is a certified organic fruit.
    3. It is a certified organic fruit from a polyculture farm.
    4. It is a certified organic fruit from a polyculture farm following fair-trade.
    5. It is a certified organic fruit from a polyculture farm following fair-trade that is powdered to make a pure, natural, organic detergent.

    We’ve been using this fruit, which is a detergent, exclusively for 1 year to this date.

    Happy new year! And Happy washing to you too!

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    Going Beyond Organic: Monoculture vs Polyculture

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    All the products we create at Krya, are made from plants and their parts: fruits, leaves, shoots, roots.

    An important part of being a sustainable company is to make informed choices that are sustainable to the system as a whole.

    In the set of organic farms that we had shortlisted for sourcing our plant based raw materials, we had two options:

    1. A plantation /monoculture farm
    2. A Polyculture farm

    A monoculture farm is what I would call a ‘factory farm’. It typically has large tracts of land where just one species of plant is cultivated.  A monoculture farm is very efficient to run, as the plant cycle is the same. For example if there was a mango monoculture farm, devoted to the Banganapalli mango, the life cycle of each tree would follow the same timings. So if the fruits were ready to be picked in April, the farm could get in people to do the harvesting all at once. Monoculture farms use less labour to do the same job, harvesting for example.

    A monoculture farm works really well in the short term. A monoculture farm brings in higher yields because planting, maintenance and harvesting can be standardised. Monoculture farms also give higher plant yields, as there is no competition for resources from rival species of plants.

    However, in the long term, a monoculture farm ends up draining the soil of specific nutrients. Each plant species takes in certain nutrients into the soil, and gives back some other nutrients. If the farm had only one plant species grown in it continuously, over time, the soil in that farm loses nutrients specific to the plant grown there.

    Also monoculture farms are under greater risk from diseases. A single pathogen can wipe out the entire cultivation, taking it years to get back to the same levels.

    A polyculture farm plants multiple crops in the same space avoiding large belts of single crops. In the short term, polyculture farms seem to be more expensive because of needing more labour. In the long term, polyculture farms grow stronger crops , encouraging lesser use of pesticides, as there is higher resistance to disease. The variety of crops increases local biodiversity, improving pollination, and soil nutrients.

    The soil gets richer as there is a symbiotic relationship between the different species that are planted on the crop, and the system works as a whole.

    Krya’s experience on a polyculture farm

    We source one of our key fruits from a beautiful, organic polyculture farm in Andhra Pradesh.

    krya polyculture farm

    The farm used to be an arid wasteland, which with a lot of hard work spread over 20 years, is now a verdant cool oasis spread over 1000 acres with 3 main complementary crops and several other plants and herbs. It is home to deer, rabbits, snakes, boars, mongoose, parrots and many other birds which helps complete the local ecosystem.

    We’ve found after extensive testing that plants sourced from such sustainable & balanced polyculture farms work better, because they grow stronger in rich, nourished soil.

    the fruit that is a ...

    This approach helps us create products that work and leaves the land happier than before.

    Which make Us Happy.

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